Handle Escape characters In QTP

What are  metacharacters that require special treatment when trying to match them. To match these special characters, you must first escape those characters, that is, precede them with a backslash character (\). The following table shows those special characters and their meanings:

Special Character Comment
$ Matches the position at the end of an input string. If the RegExp object's Multiline property is set, $ also matches the position preceding '\n' or '\r'. To match the $ character itself, use \$.
( ) Marks the beginning and end of a subexpression. Subexpressions can be captured for later use. To match these characters, use \( and \).
* Matches the preceding subexpression zero or more times. To match the * character, use \*.
+ Matches the preceding subexpression one or more times. To match the + character, use \+.
. Matches any single character except the newline character \n. To match ., use \.
[ Marks the beginning of a bracket expression. To match [, use \[.
? Matches the preceding subexpression zero or one time, or indicates a non-greedy quantifier. To match the ? character, use \?.
\ Marks the next character as either a special character, a literal, a backreference, or an octal escape. For example, 'n' matches the character 'n'. '\n' matches a newline character. The sequence '\\' matches "\" and '\(' matches "(".
^ Matches the position at the beginning of an input string except when used in a bracket expression where it negates the character set. To match the ^ character itself, use \^.
{ Marks the beginning of a quantifier expression. To match {, use \{.
| Indicates a choice between two items. To match |, use \|.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.